The ultimate responsive design challenge

Well, if nothing convinces you to take responsive Web design seriously, consider this: there are now approximately eight thousand special people poised to use your application. Eight thousand select, elite, affluent, early-adopter people, eager to purchase something new, something you can offer just to them. Eight thousand people who probably influence eight thousand others, and so on.

Eight thousand Google Glass users.

Think about it: does your application’s interface really scale down to the size of an average person’s eyeball? If you tore your hair out over the task of making a mobile version of your site usable and attractive, you’re probably tempted to ignore the vast problem of responsively designing for Google Glass for as long as you can. This would be a mistake, for it’s a great opportunity for a clever designer. You’ll be the toast of the Web, widely cited as an innovator, if you come up with any workable solution to this problem.

The main difficulty, of course, is deciding which areas of content to display first. Given the device’s extremely limited screen width, you’ll probably want to use infinite scrolling. User objections to this construct will most likely be fewer than in other contexts, since it’s by verbal commands, rather than hand-cramping mousing or touch events, that scrolling proceeds in Google Glass. Determining how to order your content is really the task of a prose or copywriting expert, but here are a few tips:

  • Require logins immediately. You want to make sure that you’re serving this interface only to registered users, people who have real commitment to your application. Otherwise, you’ll just get some tire-kickers who won’t pay for anything, and the expense you incurred developing this Google Glass layout won’t be justified.
  • Use short, punchy sentences, not long paragraphs. Google Glass users have just seconds to glance at your content, before they return to interrupted tasks like family dinners, driving on freeways, and sleeping. Take a hint from current presentation slide style: use short words, preferably with four letters, in all uppercase letters. Use slang and abbreviations liberally to save space and to communicate your point efficiently.
  • Add visual stimulus to keep your users engaged. At random moments, animate portions of the screen without requiring user input. Give the user a rest from the trying job of reading prose by strobing the display’s colors, or reversing light for dark values.

  • Take advantage of Google Glass’s audio output. Which of your users won’t like to hear uninterrupted background music as they scroll your content? You could even imitate the wildly popular practice of playing intermittent system announcements, which most of us are familiar with from calling service lines. Remember, as fashion-forward as Google Glass users are, they’ll still be reassured by your adopting familiar techniques from older media to help them navigate this exciting new technology.

Google Glass builds on technology devised in 1960s West Germany.
Google Glass builds on technology devised in 1960s West Germany.