Ada Lovelace Day (#ALD13): Anca Mosoiu

Erika and I entered the wrong door at first, learning only by the flash displayed on the walls that we were in the tattoo parlor, not the conference room where we’d meet our client. Once within the appealing 1920s store front adjacent, we met a serenely smiling young woman welcoming us to Tech Liminal, Oakland’s first co-working spot. The space was so newly opened a fan blasted on “High” to disperse paint fumes. The décor was a mix of sleek tech and East Bay thrift; we felt right at home. Met the client, concluded our business, finished the project–and I kept returning to Tech Liminal.

I came to evenings about jQuery, Python, and WordPress. I watched a fascinating presentation about the Internet as used in Iran and Estonia. During the Occupy Oakland hurly-burly just a few blocks away, I went to a Meet-up all the same, even if a police helicopter felt obliged to follow me as I rode up Alice Street on my bicycle. When the Indiegogo campaign for Tech Liminal’s move to swanky downtown digs started, I didn’t hesitate to contribute.

Heck, yeah. Anything to help Anca Mosoiu.

Let me tell you a little about Oakland, California. We’re just across a bay from San Francisco, we’re about a third its size, and about half its population. News stories about Oaklanders tend to paint us as fearful crime victims picking through the rubble of a de-industrialized wasteland, California’s Detroit. In the last three or four years, though, Oakland’s received some positive attention for its lively restaurant scene and its (relatively) less overpriced real estate. The hipsters have conspicuously moved in. Oakland! San Francisco’s Brooklyn!

Those of us who’d been living here all along already knew this, of course. I wasn’t the only one who’d given SF life a good try, but came to Oakland to stay. We knew Oakland had wonderful qualities–redwood forests in the hills, reusable factory buildings on the waterfront, and inventive people all over town.

But what matters is what we did, which, for most of us, was pretty much nothing.

Anca had the courage, vision, and stamina to stand apart. She didn’t want to recreate the self-absorbed SF tech scene. She studied who works in tech in Oakland, and found a group distinct from the lookalike bros blathering about this month’s trendy JavaScript framework in South Park: people who work for small businesses. People who maintain blogs for their churches or non-profit agencies. People concerned about maintaining content in multiple character sets. People who are performers or artists, and need a higher level of digital literacy to promote their work. Oakland people.

I’ll never know how discouraged Anca felt as she struggled to establish a tech business not just in Oakland, but in the depths of the Great Recession. I’ll never know if she ever doubted her vision of Tech Liminal as community center, as more than rental space. One of Anca’s most admirable qualities is her steady, reassuring unflappability. Around someone like that you feel sure the future’s going to be fine. Maybe it won’t be slick, maybe it won’t rain VC money, maybe it’ll be next door to a tattoo parlor. But it’ll bring in other people, their energy and ideas, and soon enough the whole thing has greater momentum than a skateboard flying down Keller Avenue.

Thank you, Anca.

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