Thrills! Chills! It’s InstallFest!

Last weekend brought the latest RailsBridge workshop to San Francisco (man, these workshops are really gaining momentum–there’s yet another one already scheduled for December 3-4. And, yup, it’s waitlisted). This time I ventured beyond my usual semi-skilled volunteer roles by offering to help workshop participants install the software required for the workshop. At last I felt comfortable enough with the process of getting Rails up and running that I wanted to assist novice programmers with the heinous chore fascinating challenge. Never thought I could do this–and it was thrilling when I did.

“InstallFest” is the happy-face designation we give the Friday night slog before each Rails for Women workshop. All participants must attend so it can be verified they have the appropriate dev environment set up on their laptops for Saturday’s curriculum. I attended InstallFest myself at the very first workshop over two years ago, and I still remember how frustrating it was for me: what are all these commands? Why do I keep getting error messages? And how come we can’t just install Locomotive or InstantRails and get it over with?

"Railsbridge installfest," by Romy Ilano

I’ll take the last question. Workshop attendees, here’s one reason why we don’t want you just pointing and clicking into a working Rails setup: we’re selfish.

Yeah, you might’ve thought all these volunteers watching over your shoulder as you type a lot of gibberish into a console window were selfless angels propelled by righteous sentiment to help you gain entry to the exclusive community of Rails developers. Well, sure, we are, but fundamentally, we’re…

Rails problem vampires.

Didn’t you notice how exciting we found the error messages in your terminal window? How about when we hopped up and down, shouting about malformed Gemfiles? And when two or more of us elbowed each other to peer at that mystifying line of code on your laptop screen–rake aborted (is that legal?), maybe you suspected.

“Hmmm,” you thought. “These people really want to expose me to all the gears, widgets, and thingamajigs that make up Rails, even if those don’t always work.”

My gosh, you saw through it, didn’t you? Your intuition is valid–at InstallFest you were surrounded by people who wanted to know where the installation process breaks down. You couldn’t even see all of us problem vampires–some were watching from afar, via discussion lists. We yearned to see where the instructions confused you and which of those d*mned Ruby gems didn’t load. We can’t make the installation a point-and-click process: there are technical constraints, for one thing, but more importantly, it would deny us that rich diet of error messages we crave and require.

You won’t need to bring a necklace of garlic or a wooden stake to attend InstallFest again. No, perhaps instead you will volunteer, twice, many times. Gradually, painlessly, unnoticeably…you, too, might also become a Rails problem vampire.